Registed Nurses' Association of Ontario

Implementation Resources

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As a known risk factor for cancer, stroke,  heart and lung diseases in Canada, the health and economic costs associated with tobacco use are estimated to be $17 billion annually, including $4.4 billion in direct health-care costs1. In 2015, approximately 3.9 million Canadians, fifteen years of age and older were smokers, and the majority were considering quitting and have made quit attempts2. In Ontario alone, about 13,000 people die annually from diseases caused by smoking.

Nestled in the rural community of Millbrook is Centennial Place Long-Term Care (LTC)  home with 128 residents. 

Highland Wood is a non-profit 30-bed long-term care home, and is attached to the Haliburton Highland Health Services in the Central East Local Health Integration Network.

Michelle Douglas, the director of care (DOC) reflected on influenza season as being a difficult time for both residents and families when visitors are limited during an outbreak.

Faith Manor is a 120-bed long-term care (LTC) home in the Central West region. As part of Holland Christian Homes, the home serves mainly the Christian community, and those primarily of Dutch heritage.

Ontario long-term care (LTC) homes are required by legislation to have evidence-based clinical programs. To support the implementation of evidence-informed clinical programs, Shaila Aranha, the LTC best practice coordinator in the Waterloo Wellington (WW) region designed and facilitated Communities of Practice (CoP). A CoP is a group of people with a shared interest who engage together in collective learning to support practice change (Wenger, McDermott & Snyder, 2002).